Data collection project - Data guide for 2013

If you have any queries please contact csykes@wcpt.org

What is the WCPT data collection project?

The World Confederation for Physical Therapy is collecting a set of internationally significant data items or pieces of information from all WCPT member organisations.

Once collected, this information will provide what is known as a “common data set”. This set of information will provide internationally comparable, reliable and consistent data about WCPT member organisations and the physical therapy profession in the countries of the members. The data will be made available to member organisations and the regions for the purposes of national advocacy.

The compiling of the WCPT common data set (WCPT CDS) requires the willing involvement of WCPT member organisations, which need to collect and supply uniform data.  The project does not preclude member organisations or regions from collecting additional data to meet their specific needs.

A brief history of the data collection

In 2001 WCPT undertook a ‘one off’ collection of information about the education, practice and regulation of the profession from member organisations. In recognition of the changing information needs in the field, WCPT has initiated the development of an annual data collection.

A survey of member organisations was carried out in 2008. Comments on a draft set of questions were collated. A trial data set and definitions were developed in 2009; these were reviewed by the WCPT data advisory group. The data advisory group is made up of people nominated by their region or member organisation who have significant experience in data development and management.

In 2010 the question set was again revised to accommodate as far as possible the very different perspectives and capacities to provide information of member organisations. The question set was incorporated into SurveyMonkey so that reviewers could get an impression of how the dataset might be collected.

In 2011 participants in the general meeting reviewed and discussed the question set and again provided feedback. A data capture tool was built to enable member organisations to complete the data set and a data guide prepared to assist member organisations to interpret the questions in a consistent way, thus optimising the quality of the data.

The first data, for the 2011 calendar year, was collected across the world in 2012. Country profiles were made available on the member pages of the respondent WCPT member organisations.

The vision for the WCPT CDS is:

  • a data set that meets important information needs; and
  • data collection methods that are integrated with the day-to-day operations of member organisations and prevent duplication of effort, where possible.

The second collection, for the 2012 calendar year, is scheduled for the 3rd quarter of 2013.

What does the collection look like?

Information on the structure of the WCPT CDS can be found in section 2 of this data guide. Table 2.1 contains a list of the data items.

Entering and accessing WCPT CDS data

Each individual member organisation will enter data in a standard form on the WCPT website. Guidance on data entry is provided in this document. General users of the website will be able to view some pieces of the individual member organisation data presented as a standard country profile via the member organisations profile page on the WCPT website.

Data entry by the nominated people will be possible for a period of two months from notification, after which the data will be prepared for display on the WCPT website. Once the annual data collection has been collated the nominated people will be able to make changes to their data should it require updating by emailing Catherine Sykes at csykes@wcpt.org.

Please note now that the first collection is complete there is no need to re-enter the complete data set.  The second collection will consist largely of checking that the data remains current, updating changed items and completing a small number of additional items.

Collated data will be reported to the WCPT Executive Committee every year and to the membership at the general meeting every four years. A report on the annual data from the WCPT CDS collection will be available from this website (www.wcpt.org). Summary international information and regional reports may be requested. These reports may be made available on this website.

What may the WCPT CDS be used for?

Data may be used for a range of planning and evaluation purposes. For example:

  • to provide estimates of the total number of physical therapists represented by member organisations (MOs), regions and WCPT
  • together with information on country populations, estimates of numbers of physical therapists per head of population
  • comparisons of ratio of physical therapists to population across nations and regions
  • comparisons of ratio of physical therapists to population with ratio of other health professions to population
  • a profile of all member organisations in a calendar year
  • trends in physical therapy regulation, education and practice
  • to inform decisions on possible increases in the level of service
  • to indicate regions with low numbers of physical therapists in relation to the population in need
  • support planning for future service delivery
  • support budget submissions for increased funding or changing funding emphasis

What is the data guide for and how is it organised?

The data guide is designed to assist all those involved in supplying or analysing WCPT CDS data. It is organised in the following sections:

  • a step-by-step guide on how to prepare for and complete a WCPT CDS data ‘return’ using the online submission process
  • issues of privacy and confidentiality
  • guidance on possible information sources
  • information about every data item in the WCPT CDS. For most data items, the following are provided:
    • data item name
    • associated question
    • definition
    • classification (ie possible response options)
    • guide for use
    • why this data item is collected
    • an example of how this data item may be used will be added as analyses become available
  • privacy and data principles for the collection

Data transmission

Data will be transferred to WCPT by way of an online form. The form will be visible to the nominated people in each member organisation via a tab on the individual member profile page whenever they are logged in to the WCPT website. The technical requirements of the data are specified, such that it is possible to amalgamate the data at an international level. Technical support for completion of the data collection will be provided on application to csykes@wcpt.org or rmoore@wcpt.org

Updating the collection

The WCPT CDS collection will be updated on a periodic basis to reflect the changing needs of the Confederation and its members (to be established).

A process of data quality improvement will be set in place to enhance the validity and reliability of the aggregated data. Member organisations may apply for advice and will be provided with feedback as required.

The time table for submitting new items will be:

Month Action
January All proposals for new items and changes to items received by WCPT
February/March Develop and test new data items, revise and update current items
March/April Review of proposed changes by WCPT Executive Committee (EC)
July Proposed changes to data collection circulated to member organisations
October Comments received and final data collection materials circulated following EC endorsement
January Implementation of updated collection

The updating process commenced in 2013.

Who to contact for help

For further information about the WCPT CDS collection, to make comments on the data guide or the collection please contact:

Catherine Sykes
Professional Policy Consultant
World Confederation for Physical Therapy (WCPT)
Victoria Charity Centre
11 Belgrave Road
London, SW1V 1RB

csykes@wcpt.org
Tel: +44 (0)20 7931 6465
Fax: +44 (0)20 7931 6494

How to conduct your WCPT CDS collection

Step-by-step guide to completing your WCPT CDS collection

  1. Ensure you have appropriate privacy principles and practices in place.
  2. Designate a responsible person to submit the information.
  3. Establish which data items you need to collect.
  4. Establish possible sources of information.
  5. Establish how you are going to record information and start collecting the requested information for transmission to WCPT at the specified time.
  6. By the end of September 2013 ensure that the online collection form has been completed with information about the previous calendar year. The reference date is 31 December each year.

Ensuring you respect privacy and have appropriate information handling practices in place

It is the responsibility of each member organisation to inform members about the WCPT CDS collection.

It is important that member organisations are aware that data transmitted to the WCPT will be used only for statistical purposes and will not affect membership status.

Member organisations should comply with their national legislation regarding data security and transmission protocols when providing information to WCPT.

WCPT will be responsible for ensuring that data dissemination is carried out without compromising the member organisations. For this reason, data received will be checked for quality and completeness and returned to the member organisation for checking and permission to publish on the WCPT website. Drafts of the quadrennial CDS report will be circulated to member organisations for comment prior to presentation at the general meeting.

Designating a responsible person

In order for the online submission form to be completed WCPT will need to set in place the necessary authorisations. In the first instance the primary contact person and the President of the member organisation will be authorised to complete or change the online form. Should you need to have an alternative designated person please contact Rachel Moore at rmoore@wcpt.org

Preparing for the online submission

Before going online it would be beneficial to review the data guide to see which data items are relevant for your member organisation. For example if there is no physical therapist professional entry level education in the country you will not need to complete all the items on education.

Collecting all the information together before going online will make the online process relatively quick. Please remember the first time the CDS is completed all the information will need to be entered. In subsequent years only information that has changed will need to be altered and new items completed; thus shortening the data entry time significantly.

If you have any questions contact Catherine Sykes at csykes@wcpt.org

What if a member organisation does not send information to WCPT?

The strength of an international collection lies in how complete the collection is. Every effort to provide complete and accurate information will add to the potential to influence decision makers, at national as well as international levels.

Incomplete data will appear as 'Country profile data not available' on the member organisation country profile on the WCPT website. It is expected that over time the quality and completeness of the data will improve.

Every piece of information entered is important. Whilst it is preferable to have complete data it is recognised that this is not always easy or feasible. Please provide every piece of information you can and seek assistance from the WCPT secretariat if necessary. We will do our best to help you complete the data set.

Which data items do you need to collect?

For a complete picture of the profession it is desirable that all relevant items are completed by all WCPT member organisations (MOs). However, for countries where no physical therapists are trained there will be direction to bypass the questions on education. Similarly, where regulation is not currently in place, MOs will be directed to bypass questions in that section.

The table below outlines the data items in the WCPT CDS.

Metadata is often called ‘data about data’. It is the underlying structured description of the content, quality, condition or other characteristics of data which serves to improve quality, relevance and consistency of international information about the profession. The data items have been developed using the International Standards Organization standard for metadata, ISO11179 and are presented in section 3.

It is well accepted in the world of statistics that metadata leads to better data. This is because they enable all people collecting, using and exchanging data to share the same understanding of its meaning and representation.

Metadata standards facilitate information sharing among users of the data; ensure comparability and consistency of the data collected and produced from the collection; offer a means of narrowing the variety of ways information is exchanged, and reduce the cost of data development. The metadata standards in this guide are available for use by member organisations and WCPT regions for their own purposes.

D - data item, I - information item, * - items marked are mandatory.
       
Item Values Data item For inclusion on the web profile
*Official title by which the profession is best known in English Free text I Official title
*Title legally protected

Yes, in all jurisdictions/states/provinces

Yes, in some jurisdictions/states/provinces

No

D Yes
Other titles for the profession used in the country Free text I Recognised official titles and an indicator of whether protected by legislation
Indicator of whether a title is protected by legislation

Yes, in all jurisdictions/states/provinces

Yes, in some jurisdictions/states/provinces

No

D
*Total number of physical therapist members registered in the member organisation on 31 December 2012 Number D Note: This item is collected as part of the annual membership renewal

*Number of members who are female

*Number of members who are male

Number

 

Number

D Not on web profile, for use by WCPT

Male:female ratio

Note: This will be calculated from the numbers given above
Ratio Derived Yes
*Estimate of the total number of physical therapists practising in the country Number D Number and estimate indicator
*Estimate indicator

Estimated

Not estimated

D
*Data source(s) Free text I Not on web profile, for use by WCPT to follow up and see if it is possible to get accurate figures from the agencies involved

Physical therapists per 1,000 population

Note: This is a derived item and will be calculated by WCPT. The country population will be taken from the World Bank population data
Number Derived ratio Yes
*Estimate of number of physical therapists educated oustide the country that entered practice in the reference year Number D  
*National organisation of student physical therapists

Student physical therapists are represented by the WCPT member organisation

Student physical therapists are represented by an independent organisation

There is no organisation of student physical therapists
D One response only

Name of student physical therapist organisation

Key contact

Email address

Web address
Free text I Not on web profile, for use by WCPT to follow up and for advocacy purposes
*National organisation of physical therapist support workers

Physical therapist support workers are represented by the WCPT member organisation

Physical therapist support workers are represented by an independent organisation

There is no organisation of physical therapist support workers
D Not on web profile, for use by WCPT to follow up and for advocacy purposes

Name of physical therapist support worker organisation

Key contact

Email address

Web address
Free text I Not on web profile, for use by WCPT to follow up and for advocacy purposes
*Special interest groups recognised

None

Amputee rehabilitation

Aquatics

Acupuncture

Animal practice

Cardiorespiratory physical therapy

Educators in physical therapy

Electrophysical agents

Health promotion

Information management and technology

Intellectual disability

Management/administration

Mental health

Neurology

Orthopaedics/manual therapy

Occupational health and ergonomics

Older people

Oncology/palliative care

Pain

Paediatrics

Policy

Private practitioners

Sports physical therapy

Women's health
I Only those topics to which there has been a positive response will be displayed
Others Free text D Yes
*Peer reviewed publication Yes/No D Yes
Peer reviewed publication access details Free text - title, web address and frequency I Yes
*Newsletter Yes/No D Yes
Newsletter access details Free text - title, web address and frequency I Yes
Member organisation events Yes/No D Yes
Member organisation CPD schedule Yes/No D Yes
CPD schedule access details Free text I Yes
Strategies in support of physical therapists and student physical therapists with disability Free text I Not on web profile, for use by WCPT for projects and advocacy purposes
*More than one national physical therapy professional organisation in the country Yes/No D Not on web profile, for use by WCPT to follow up and for policy and advocacy purposes
Name of other organisations and brief description of their role Free text I
*Existing collaborative arrangement with another national physical therapy professional association during the reference year Yes/No D Yes or no
Partner organisations and activities Free text I Not on web profile, for use by WCPT to follow up and for advocacy purposes
*Number of physical therapist professional entry level programmes recognised/acknowledged by the member organisation Number D Number
*Review of information on entry level education programme checked Yes/No D For use by WCPT
Existence of programmes offering physical therapist professional entry-level education that are not recognised by the WCPT member organisation Yes/No D Not on web profile, for use by WCPT to follow up and for advocacy purposes
Information about the programmes and the reason they are not recognised Free text I
Minimum level of education for admission to physical therapist professional entry level education Defined criteria D Minimum level of education required to gain entry
Minimum level of education on completion of a physical therapist professional entry level programme Define D Minimum level of education on completion
Full time equivalent years of physical therapist professional education in the entry level programme Number D Number
More than one level of physical therapist professional entry level education Yes/No D Yes or no
If yes, please specify exit levels that apply for each entry level listed

Entry level defined criteria

Exit level defined criteria
D Exit levels for each entry level
Number of student places for physical therapist professional entry level education in the reference year Number D Not on web profile, for use by WCPT to follow up and for advocacy purposes
Number of people who successfully completed a recognised physical therapist professional entry level programme in the reference year Number D
*Post professional degree programmes in the country Yes/No D Yes or no
Degree programmes available in the country

None

Bachelor's degree

Graduate diploma

Master's degree

Professional doctorate

Research doctorare

D One or more of the categories
*Formal programmes of specialisation available in the country Yes/No D Yes or no
Formal programmes of specialisation available in the country

None

Amputee rehabilitation

Aquatics

Acupuncture

Animal practice

Cardiorespiratory physical therapy

Educators in physical therapy

Electrophysical agents

Health promotion

Information management and technology

Intellectual disability

Management/administration

Mental health

Neurology

Orthopaedics/manual therapy

Occupational health and ergonomics

Older people

Oncology/palliative care

Pain

Paediatrics

Policy

Private practitioners

Sports physical therapy

Women's health
D One or more of the categories
Other formal programmes of specialisation Free text D Yes
*Scope of practice of physical therapists is defined by

Ministry of Health or other government department

One or more independent licencing/registration authorities

WCPT member organisation

A partnership between a registration body and the WCPT member organisation

Not defined

Other
D One response
*Do professional entry level programmes in the country educate physical therapists to be first contact/autonomous practitioners?

Yes, all programmes

Yes, some programmes

No

Not application, there are no physical therapist professional entry level programmes in the country

D One response
*In the country physical therapists are permitted to

Act as first contact/autonomous practitioners

Assess patients/clients

Make a diagnosis

Treat (interventions, advice and evaluation of outcome)

Refer to other specialists/services

Offer preventive advice/services
I Only those items to which there has been a positive response will be displayed
*Legislation preventing physical therapists establishing private practice Yes/No D Yes or no
*Source of funding for private physical therapy services

Personal out of pocket payments

Private or voluntary insurance premiums

Public tax funded system

Compulsory insurance premiums

Other

D One or more of the categories
Other sources of funding private physical therapy services

Free text

I  
*Source of funding for public physical therapy services

Personal out of pocket payments

Private or voluntary insurance premiums

Public tax funded system

Compulsory insurance premiums

Other

D One or more of the categories
Other sources of funding public physical therapy services Free text I  
*Service users able to refer themselves to physical therapist without medical referral Yes/No/Unknown D One of three categories
Self referral to private practice Yes/No D Yes or no
Private insurance reimbursement

In full

In part

No

D One of three categories
Self referral to public services Yes/No D Yes or no
Limitations to self referral to public services Yes/No D Yes or no
Limitations to self referral to public services Free text I  
*Is physical therapist practice guided by specified standards of practice

Yes, the standard of the regulatory authority

Yes, the WCPT MO specific standard

Yes, the WCPT standard

Yes, more than one

No
D One response
Link to or a copy of the standard URL or document I Not on web profile, for use by WCPT to follow up and for advocacy purposes
*Is a code of conduct specified by the WCPT member organisation

Yes, the code of conduct of the regulatory authority

Yes, WCPT MO specific code of conduct

Yes, WCPT ethical guidelines

Yes, more than one

No

D Yes or no
Link to or a copy of the document URL or document I Not on web profile, for use by WCPT to follow up and for advocacy purposes
Consistency of code of practice to WPT ethical principles Yes/No D Yes or no
*Requirement to register or gain a licence to practise in the country or certain regions of the country Yes/No D Yes or no
*Where there is no legislation is there any other form of regulation Yes/No D Not on web profile, for use by WCPT to follow up and for advocacy purposes
*Form of regulation Free text I Yes
*Continuous professional development as a requirement for re-registration Yes/No D Yes or no
*Continuous professional development as a requirement for membership of the member organisation Yes/No D Yes or no

How to collect and transmit information

The data collection process: Figure 1 below gives an overall picture of the collection, collation and dissemination of the WCPT CDS data in the context of day to day operations.

How often do you need to transmit information?

In the third quarter of the 2013 calendar year WCPT member organisations will receive a reminder to enter updated WCPT CDS information on their MO profile page on the WCPT website, by 30 September. Should information change during the time between collections, the member organisation designated person or their alternate can update the member organisation profile by contacting Catherine Sykes at csykes@wcpt.org

Key dates for the common data set collection:

Month Action
31 December 2012 Census date – the date on which numbers of members are taken.
July Letter to member organisations with instructions for the annual collection.
30 September Deadline for data to be submitted online by member organisations. Web interface closed.
31 December 2013 Data cleaned and checked by WCPT secretariat.  
February 2014 Profile page content confirmed by MOs.
May Draft summary report to WCPT EC and subsequently to member organisations for comment.
June Report completed and WCPT website updated with report.

Data items in the WCPT CDS

The following section contains data item definitions.

2.1.1 Title - profession, English, X[99]
Defined as The formal name by which the profession of physical therapy is known in English in the country of the member organisation.
Question What is the official title, in English, by which the profession of physical therapy is BEST known in your country
Classification A descriptor of up to 100 characters
Guide for use

This is a compulsory item, the response to which will appear on the WCPT member organisation profile page.

  • Enter the formal name for the profession
  • Capital letters may be used for each word in the title
  • Formal name should be in English
  • If there is more than one formal name in English, for example both physical therapy and physiotherapy are recognised, select the one that is best known and more generally used and list the other in response to question 2.3
Why is this data item collected? As a means of identifying the profession to interested persons or parties.
How this data item may be used A list of formal titles has been added to the Policy statement: Protection of title

 

2.1.2. Title - profession protected, Yes/No
Defined as An indicator of whether a name used by the profession is protected by legislation as represented by a code.
Question Is the official title, in English, by which the profession of physical therapy is BEST known in your country protected by legislation?
Classification

1.1 Yes, in ALL jurisdictions/states/provinces

1.2 Yes, in SOME jurisdictions/states/provinces

2 No

9 Not known or not reported

Guide for use

This is a compulsory item, the response to which will appear on the WCPT member organisation profile page.

  • Select Yes (1.1) if the title for the profession IS protected by legislation and in all jurisdictions of the country
  • A jurisdiction is an area with a set of laws under the control of a government or court system. A jurisdiction may be a state, territory or province of a country
  • Select Yes (1.2) if the title for the profession IS protected by legislation but only in some jurisdictions in the country
  • The country profile page for the member organisation will indicate whether or not titles are protected by legislation
  • Select No (2) if the name for the profession is NOT protected
  • 9 should not be used except where the state of protection is not known
  • This indicator can be applied to the name by which the profession is best known and to all other formal names by which the profession is known
  • If there is more than one formal name, this item will need to be completed separately for each of the formal names
  • Where the title is recognised in more than one language this item will need to be completed separately for each language version of the formal name
Why is this data item collected?

Protection of title is the legal system whereby title/titles may only be used by those holding a recognised qualification or who are registered with a competent authority.Protection of professional title is one way of ensuring that the general public only receive physical therapy services from people who are indeed qualified to do so.

The World Confederation for Physical Therapy (WCPT) claims exclusivity to the professional names of physical therapy or physiotherapy, the titles physical therapist or physiotherapist and appropriate abbreviations (for example PT, FT, physio) as such or in any translation, are the sole preserve of persons who hold qualifications approved by national professional associations.

This data item will be used to indicate the physical therapist professional titles that are protected.

This item by be used with items 2.1.1 and 2.2.1 and 2.3.

 

2.2.1 Title - profession, English, X[99]
Defined as The formal name by which the profession of physical therapy is known in the official language in the country of the member organisation.
Question What is the official professional title, in the most generally used official language, by which the profession of physical therapy is known in your country?
Classification A descriptor of up to 100 characters
Guide for use

This is a compulsory item, the response to which will appear on the WCPT member organisation profile page.

  • Enter the formal name for the profession
  • Capital letters may be used for each word in the title
  • Formal name should be in the most generally used official language of the country
  • If there is more than one formal name select the one that is best known and more generally used and list the other in response to question 2.3
Why is this data item collected? As a means of identifying the profession to interested persons or parties.
How this data item may be used A list of formal titles has been added to the Policy statement: Protection of title

 

2.3 Title - profession, X[99]
Defined as A formal name by which the profession of physical therapy is known in the country of the member organisation.
Question List all OTHER official titles for the profession in all the official languages of your country, and indicate whether or not they are protected by legislation.
Classification A descriptor of up to 100 characters
Guide for use
  • Enter the formal title for the profession
  • Capital letters may be used for each word in the title
  • Formal names should be entered in the official language(s) used in the country
  • Where there are several formal names for the profession, all should be listed
  • The title may be entered in national scripts.  For example عربي , ภาษาไทย, ελληνικά.  Where the title requires a script that may not be recognised across the world please enter the title in English phonetics
  • This item will be displayed on the WCPT website
Why is this data item collected?

As a means of identifying the profession to interested persons or parties.

As a means of listing all recognised titles used by the physical therapy profession around the world.

 

3. Member organisation - total number of physical therapist members
Defined as The total number of people registered as physical therapist members of the member organisation.
Question What is the total number of physical therapist members registered during the member organisation on the reference day (31 December)?
Classification

Total number N[NNNNNN], maximum character length 7

Unit of measure – Person
Guide for use

This is a compulsory item, the response to which will appear on the WCPT member organisation profile page.

This item is collected as part of the annual membership renewal process.  Each person registered as a member of the WCPT member organisation who is qualified to practise as a physical therapist on the reference day (31 December) should be counted only once.

Why is this data item collected?

Some member organisations represent not only physical therapists but also support personnel and students. This data item collects only physical therapist members and is used for calculating the annual fees due to WCPT.

Member numbers can also be used in labour force planning and monitoring.
How this data item may be used

The item may be used together with the estimate of physical therapists working in the country to calculate the proportion of physical therapists in a country who are members of the WCPT member organisation

 

3.1.1. Member organisation - total number of female physical therapist members
Defined as The total number of people registered as physical therapist members of the member organisation who report as being female.
Question What is the total number of members registered with the WCPT member organisation on the reference day (31 December) who report as being female?
Classification

Total number N[NNNN], maximum character length 5

Unit of measure – Person
Guide for use
  • This is a compulsory item.
  • Information about the gender of a member of a WCPT member organisation may be collected from membership applications or member registers. An alternative source might be a registration authority.
Why is this data item collected?

Men and women tend to have different patterns of work, especially in the years where women are having children. Monitoring the number and proportion of women may assist in workforce planning, and advocacy in relation to workforce planning.

The ratio will be calculated from the responses to items 3.1.1 and 3.1.2

 

3.1.2. Member organisation - total number of male physical therapist members
Defined as The total number of people registered as physical therapist members of the member organisation who report as being male.
Question What is the total number of members registered with the WCPT member organisation on the reference day (31 December) who report as being male?
Classification

Total number N[NNNN], maximum character length 5

Unit of measure – Person
Guide for use
  • This is a compulsory item.
  • Information about the gender of a member of a WCPT member organisation may be collected from membership applications or member registers. An alternative source might be a registration authority.
Why is this data item collected?

Men and women tend to have different patterns of work, especially in the years where women are having children. The number and proportions of males to females may assist in workforce planning, and advocacy in relation to workforce planning.

The ratio will be calculated from the responses to items 3.1.1 and 3.1.2

 

3.1.3. Member organisation - ratio male to female physical therapist members
Defined as The ratio of people registered as physical therapist members of the WCPT member organisation who report as being male and female.
Question What is the ratio of male to female members registered with the member organisation on the reference day (31 December)?
Classification

Ratio N[NN]:N[NN], maximum character length 6

Unit of measure – Person
Guide for use
  • This ratio will appear on the WCPT member organisation profile page.
  • Information about the gender of a member of a member organisation may be collected from membership applications or member registers. An alternative source might be a registration authority.
Why is this data item collected?

Men and women tend to have different patterns of work, especially in the years where women are having children. The proportion of males to females may assist in workforce planning, and advocacy in relation to workforce planning.

The ratio will be calculated from the responses to items 3.1.1 and 3.1.2

 

4.1. Physical therapists - country total number
Defined as The total number of people practising as a physical therapist in the country of the member organisation.
Question What is the best estimate of the TOTAL number of physical therapists practising in the country (whether they are members or not)?
Classification

Total number N[NNN,NNN], maximum character length 7

Unit of measure – Person
Guide for use
  • This is a compulsory item, the response to which will appear on the WCPT member organisation profile page.
  • A number between 0 and 9,999,999 representing the total number of people who practise in the physical therapy profession in the reference year.
  • People practising in the country who are not members of the WCPT member organisation should be included.
  • Possible sources of data:
    • Where national registration is required before a person can practise the professional the register should be the source of information.
    • Where registration is undertaken at jurisdiction level. The numbers or registrations for each jurisdiction should be summed to form a national total.
    • Where membership of the professional organisation is a requirement for practise the membership list should provide the number.
    • Where there is more than one professional organisation, summing the members of all the organisations would be necessary.
    • National statistical offices may be able to provide an estimate of the number of physical therapists in a country.
    • Some countries conduct employment surveys or health labour force surveys where occupation is recorded. If the International Standard Classification of Occupation (ISCO) or a national classification of occupation consistent with ISCO is used code 2264 Physiotherapists can be used to identify respondents who declare themselves as physical therapists.
    • A population census may record the occupation of respondents; this too may give an estimate of the number of people who declare themselves as physical therapists.
    • Surveys of service settings where physical therapists are employed, for example government hospitals and community based facilities, faith based organisations, non-governmental organisations and charities. Aggregation from such surveys may give an estimate of total number of physical therapists working in a country.
Why is this data item collected?

A frequently required statistic for both service provision and labour force monitoring is the ratio of professionals to population.

Together with the population number (from the World Bank Population) this important data item permits estimation of the number of physical therapists per 1,000 head of population, an indicator of the level of service provision.

 

4.2. Number - estimate indicator
Defined as An indicator of whether a number was estimated.
Question Is the number an estimate or from an authoritative source eg registration authority?
Classification

1 Estimated

2 Authoritative

Guide for use
  • This is a compulsory item.
  • The indicator will be displayed adjacent to the number as either “Estimated number” or “Authoritative number”.
  • This data item will be reported in conjunction with: 5.1 Physical Therapists - Country total number.
Why is this data item collected?

This indicator will enable judgements to be made about the reliability of the data.

It is envisaged that the use of estimated numbers will decrease as member organisations improve the quality of the data collected during the membership process and find ways to access high quality sources of information from statistical offices and registration authorities, where these exist.

 

4.3. Physical therapists - country total number - source of data
Defined as A description of the source(s) of data.
Question What is/are the source(s) of data for this number?
Classification Free text information about the source(s) of the number of physical therapists in the country.
Guide for use
  • The full name of the agency from which data has been supplied and any contact details enabling follow up should be provided. Where there is a web address it should be included.
  • The title of the collection and the year of publication should be included.
Why is this data item collected? This information may be used by the WCPT secretariat to follow up with the agencies involved to ascertain the most reliable estimate and any issues concerning the reliability of the data.

 

4.4. Physical therapist - educated outside the country, number N[NNNN]
Defined as A number representing all physical therapists educated outside the country who entered practice in the country in the reference year.
Question What is the best estimate of physical therapists educated outside the country who entered practice in the reference year?
Classification

Total number N[NNNN], maximum character length 5

Unit of measure – people.
Guide for use
  • This is a compulsory item. 
  • A number between 0 and 99999 representing the total number of physical therapists educated outside the country entering practice in the country in the reference year.
  • 0 is a valid number where there are no physical therapists educated outside the country entering practice in the country in the reference year.
  • The source of this number may be:
    • Immigration statistics
    • Surveys of physical therapy services
    • Registration authorities where registration is a requirement for practise following entry to the country
    • New registrations on registers of members of the WCPT member organisation, where membership is a requirement for practise following entry to the country.
Why is this data item collected?

For WCPT to represent an accurate picture of the profession, potential workforce numbers and qualifications are important data.  Knowing the number of successful completions of physical therapist professional entry level programmes will assist with workforce planning and advocacy.

 

 

5.1.1. Organisation - student physical therapists
Defined as An indicator of whether a national organisation for people who are studying in an entry level programme for physical therapy exists.
Question Is there a national organisation for entry level student physical therapists in your country?
Classification

1 Yes, student physical therapists are part of the WCPT member organisation.

2 Yes, student physical therapists are have a separate independent organisation.

3 No, there is no organisation of student physical therapists.

9 Not known or not reported

Guide for use
  • This is a compulsory item, the response to which will appear on the WCPT member organisation profile page.
  • If the WCPT member organisation permits student members select 1.
  • Where student physical therapists form a separate national organisation select 2.
  • Where there is no organisation of student physical therapists select 3.
  • 9 should not be used except where the existence of an organisation of student physical therapists is not known.
Why is this data item collected? Some WCPT member organisations represent not only physical therapists but also support workers and students. Whether student members are represented by the WCPT member organisation or an independent organisation can be used for advocacy and marketing purposes. Establishing links between organisations of student physical therapists may facilitate international collaboration and exchange programmes.

 

5.1.2. Organisation - contact details
Defined as The group of information items that identify an organisation and differentiate it from others.
Question Please provide contact details of the (organisation type) organisation.
Classification

1 Organisation name

2 Organisation primary contact.

3 Organisation email address.

4 Organisation web address.

Guide for use
  • This item can be applied to items 5.1.1 and 5.2.2.
  • The organisation type in the question might vary.  Example: ‘Organisation of student physical therapists’ or ‘Organisation of physical therapist support personnel’
  • Organisation name is the title that the organisation uses to identify itself.
  • Organisation primary contact is the name of the person who is able to respond to enquiries on behalf of the organisation.
  • Organisation email address is a unique combination of characters used as input to electronic communication equipment for the purpose of contacting a person.  Email addresses are a combination of a username and an internet domain name (URL) joined by an @ symbol. The use of a full URL is not valid in an email address.  Example: myuserid@orgname.org.xx
  • Organisation web address or Universal Resource Locator (URL) is one form of electronic address used as a locator for an internet-based web site.  Example: http://www.orgname.org.au This is the full address, however, it is not essential to record 'http://www' as the commonly used internet browsers assume these characters are included. Therefore, the URL address could be recorded as ‘orgname.org.xx’.
  • Where any of the details are not known leave blank
Why is this data item collected? WCPT will use contact details to ascertain further information about the organisation for the purposes of advocacy and monitoring the status of the physical therapy profession.

 

5.2.1. Organisation - support personnel
Defined as An indicator of whether a national organisation for people who are physical therapy support personnel exists.
Question Is there a national organisation of physical therapist support workers in your country?
Classification

1 Yes, physical therapist support workers are part of the WCPT member organisation.

2 Yes, physical therapist support workers are have a separate organisation.

3 No, there is no organisation of physical therapist support workers.

9 Not known or not reported

Guide for use
  • This is a compulsory item, the response to which will NOT appear on the WCPT member organisation profile page.
  • If the WCPT member organisation permits physical therapist support worker members select 1.
  • Where physical therapist workers personnel form a separate national organisation select 2.
  • Where there is no organisation of physical therapist support workers select 3.
  • 9 should not be used except where the existence of an organisation of physical therapist support workers is not known.
Why is this data item collected? Some WCPT member organisations represent not only physical therapists but also support workers and students. Whether physical therapist support workersare represented by the WCPT member organisation or an independent organisation can be used for advocacy and marketing purposes.

 

5.2.2. Organisation - contact details
Defined as The group of information items that identify an organisation and differentiate it from others.
Question Please provide contact details of the (organisation type) organisation.
Classification

1 Organisation name

2 Organisation primary contact.

3 Organisation email address.

4 Organisation web address.

Guide for use
  • This item can be applied to items 6.1 and 7.1.
  • The organisation type in the question might vary.  Example: ‘Organisation of student physical therapists’ or ‘Organisation of physical therapist support personnel’
  • Organisation name is the title that the organisation uses to identify itself.
  • Organisation primary contact is the name of the person who is able to respond to enquiries on behalf of the organisation.
  • Organisation email address is a unique combination of characters used as input to electronic communication equipment for the purpose of contacting a person.  Email addresses are a combination of a username and an internet domain name (URL) joined by an @ symbol. The use of a full URL is not valid in an email address.  Example: myuserid@orgname.org.xx
  • Organisation web address or Universal Resource Locator (URL) is one form of electronic address used as a locator for an internet-based web site.  Example: http://www.orgname.org.au This is the full address, however, it is not essential to record 'http://www' as the commonly used internet browsers assume these characters are included. Therefore, the URL address could be recorded as ‘orgname.org.xx’.
  • Where any of the details are not known leave blank
Why is this data item collected? WCPT will use contact details to ascertain further information about the organisation for the purposes of advocacy and monitoring the status of the physical therapy profession.

 

6.1. Member organisation - special interest groups recognised
Defined as An indicator the special interest groups that are recognised by the WCPT member organisation.
Question Does the member organisation recognise any special interest groups/professional networks?
Classification
  1. None
  2. Amputee rehabilitation
  3. Aquatics
  4. Acupuncture
  5. Animal practice
  6. Cardiorespiratory physical therapy
  7. Educators in physical therapy
  8. Electrophysical agents
  9. Health promotion
  10. Information management and technology
  11. Intellectual disability
  12. Management/administration
  13. Mental health
  1. Neurology
  2. Orthopaedics/manual therapy
  3. Occupational health and ergonomics
  4. Older people
  5. Oncology/palliative care
  6. Pain
  7. Paediatrics
  8. Policy
  9. Private practitioners
  10. Sports physical therapy
  11. Women's health
  12. Other
Guide for use
  • This is a compulsory item. Those items that are checked will appear on the member profile page on the WCPT website.
  • Consider the range of the topic area and whether a special interest group that is recognised by the WCPT member organisation exists in the country.
  • Check all boxes where there is a national organisation representing the area of interest.
  • If there is a recognised area of interest that is not on the list, add it to other.
Why is this data item collected?

Subgroups have a specific area of interest and are important international physical therapy organisations in their own right. They promote the advancement of physical therapy and the exchange of scientific knowledge in their field. Subgroups represent clinical specialists; for example paediatrics, older people, and occupational special interests such as journal editors.

Specialisation is considered to benefit the public and the profession by promoting higher standards of physical therapy. WCPT will monitor the growth of the profession through the development of specialist subgroups through this data item.

The presence of special interest groups in several member organisations may indicate a level of interest in a particular topic such that a WCPT subgroup could be formed.

 

7.1. Member organisation - peer reviewed publication, indicator Yes/No
Defined as An indicator of whether a peer reviewed publication is published by the WCPT member organisation.
Question Does the member organisation publish a peer reviewed journal?
Classification
  1. Yes
  2. No
Guide for use
  • This is a compulsory item, the response to which will be displayed on the WCPT website
  • The content of a peer reviewed journal is largely research which has been reviewed by recognised experts in the field and approved for publication by the editor.
Why is this data item collected?

Some WCPT member organisations publish peer reviewed journals. Evidence based practice depends on effective use of peer reviewed research. This item informs which member organisations produce a peer reviewed publication which, in turn, can facilitate evidence based practice. The information can be used for advocacy and marketing purposes and illustrate the leadership of physical therapists in high quality research.

 

7.1.2. Peer reviewed publication: publication details
Defined as The group of information items that identify a publication and differentiate it from others.
Question ... please provide publication of the publication type
Classification
  1. Publication: title
  2. Publication: web address
  3. Publication: frequency of publication
Guide for use
  • This item can be applied to items 7.1 and 7.2.
  • The publication type in the question might vary e.g. 'Peer reviewed journal' or 'Newsletter'
  • Publication name is the title that is used to identify the publication e.g. myuserid@orgname.org.xx
  • Publication web address or Universal Resource Locator (URL) is one form of electronic address used a locator for an internet-based web site. e.g. http://www.orgname.org.  This is the full address, however, it is not essential to record the 'http://www' as the commonly used internet browsers assume these characters are included.  Therefore the URL address could be recorded as 'orgname.org.xx'
  • Publication: frequency of publication records the timing of publication, Examples of frequency include annual, bi annually, tri annually, quarterly, monthly, fortnightly, weekly
  • If the member organisation publishes more than 3 journals, enter the top three titles according to circulation numbers
  • Where any of the details are not known leave blank
Why is this data item collected?

WCPT will use these details to provide further information about the publication for the purposes promoting excellence in physical therapist practice and advocacy for physical therapy research.

 

8.1. Member organisation - event
Defined as An indicator of whether the WCPT member organisation holds a national conference/convention/congress.
Question Does the WCPT member organisation hold a national conference(s) of physical therapists?
Classification
  1. Yes
  2. No
Guide for use
  • This is a compulsory item, the response to which will be displayed on the WCPT website
  • A conference is a formal meeting for consultation or discussion. It may be also known as a convention or congress. A national conference is open to all members of the national professional organisation and held on a regular basis. Generally the purpose of a national conference is to present physical therapy research and/or to provide an opportunity for exchange of information or opinions and to meet physical therapist colleagues.

NOTE: If you would like your conferences listed on the WCPT website please send detials to info@wcpt.org

Why is this data item collected?

Some WCPT member organisations hold national conferences. This item will be used to compile a list of WCPT member organisations that hold annual conferences as a resource available on the WCPT website.

 

8.2. Member organisation - Continuing professional development schedule, indicator Yes/No
Defined as An indicator of whether the WCPT member organisation publishes a schedule of continuing professional education courses/events on its website.
Question Does the WCPT member organisation publish a schedule of continuing professional education courses/events on its website?
Classification
  1. Yes
  2. No
Guide for use
  • This is a compulsory item, the response to which will be displayed on the WCPT website
  • This data will be displayed on the WCPT website, and on the WCPT CPD courses page.
  • Continuing professional development (CPD) is the process through which individuals undertake learning, through a broad range of activities that maintains, develops, and enhances skills and knowledge in order to improve performance in practice.
Why is this data item collected?

Some WCPT member organisations provide listings of available continuing professional development courses and events on their websites. This item will be used to compile a list of WCPT member organisations that provide such a listing as a resource available on the WCPT website.

 

8.2.2 Address - Uniform Resource Locator, text X{1100}
Defined as The address of a website on the world wide web (Internet) represented by a Uniform Resource Locator (URL), as represented by text.
Question …please provide web addresses for …
Classification

Text

Guide for use
  • This item can be used on a range or data items, for example 7.1, 7.2,8.2
  • Web address or Universal Resource Locator (URL) is one form of electronic address used as a locator for an internet-based web site.
  • A web address cannot have any white space.
  • A web address is a uniform resource locator and consists of 2 parts; a scheme and the web address path.
  • A scheme is the type of connection protocol that the URL is going to adhere to. The most commonly used on the internet is http. This is always followed by a colon and double backslash ‘://’. It is not compulsory for an entity to provide the scheme information as it is commonly assumed that http:// is the scheme used. But if provided it should be included in this data element as it could vary from the http value.
  • Web Address Path: following the scheme, the URL can consist of various types of information from Domain Names, Sub-Domain Names, File Names, IP addresses, Top Level Domain Names and various symbols/special characters such as ‘:’,‘&’,’$’,’#’,’?’ or ’/’. These may all be valid.
  • Example: http://www.orgname.org.au This is the full address, however, it is not essential to record 'http://www' as the commonly used internet browsers assume these characters are included. Therefore, the URL address could be recorded as ‘orgname.org.xx’.
Why is this data item collected?

URLs provided on the WCPT enable access to a range of resources on the WCPT website, member organisations and other agencies.

 

 

9.1. Member organisation - disability provision
Defined as The policies, guidelines and other resources that the WCPT member organisation has developed or collected to support the inclusion of people with disability in the profession.
Question Please list and provide web addresses of any policies, guidelines, practices and strategies that the member organisation makes available to its membership in support of people with disabilities.
Classification

Text

Guide for use
  • This is a compulsory item
  • Enter in English the titles and web addresses of any documents Please list and provide web addresses of any policies, guidelines, practices and strategies that the member organisation makes available to its membership in support of people with disabilities.
  • Examples of items that could be included: Chartered Society of Physiotherapy (UK) 2010. Information technology for disabled members: suitable adaptations. [Access date 15 December 2011] http://csplis.csp.org.uk/olibcgi?infile=details.glu&loid=56542 and the Disabled Members' Network of the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy.
Why is this data item collected?

As a response to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities this data item enables WCPT to report on how the physical therapy profession supports people with disabilities to enter and remain in the profession. Countries that are signatories to the convention and its optional protocol are required to report on their activities in support of the convention. The data item will enable WCPT member organisations to advocate for the profession in regard to the inclusion of physical therapists with disabilities.

 

10.1. Physical therapy professional organisation - indicator more than one, Yes/No
Defined as An indicator of whether there are professional organisations of physical therapists in the country in addition to the WCPT member organisation.
Question As well as the WCPT member organisation are there any other national physical therapy professional organisations in the country?
Classification

1 Yes

2 No

9 Not known or not reported

Guide for use
  • This is a compulsory item.
  • Use 1 if there are physical therapy professional organisations in the country in addition to the WCPT member organisation.
  • Use 2 if the WCPT member organisation is the ONLY professional organisation for physical therapists in the country.
  • 9 will be used where there is no response to alternative codes.
Why is this data item collected? The strength of the global voice of WCPT is in relation to the number of member organisations and the number of physical therapists that are represented. Where possible it is desirable for there to be only one national professional organisation for physical therapists such that there is a single, strong voice representing the profession at a national level. WCPT will use these data together with information provided by its member organisations to monitor the number and scope of physical therapist professional organisations.

 

10.1.2. Physical therapy professional organisation - additional information
Defined as A description of professional organisations of physical therapists in the country other than the WCPT member organisation.
Question Provide information on professional organisations of physical therapists in the country other than the WCPT member organisation.
Classification Free text description.
Guide for use
  • Information should include the name(s) of the organisation, electronic links, web addresses, addresses or the name and email contact details of individuals in the organisation(s).
Why is this data item collected? The strength of the global voice of WCPT is in relation to the number of member organisations and the number of physical therapists that are represented. Where possible it is desirable for there to be only one national professional organisation for physical therapists such that there is a single, strong voice representing the profession at a national level. WCPT will use this information, provided by its member organisations, to monitor the number and scope of physical therapist professional organisations.
 

 

11.1. Collaborative arrangement - currency indicator
Defined as An indicator or whether the member organisation is currently in a collaborative arrangement with another member organisation.
Question Was the member organisation involved in a collaborative arrangement with another national physical therapy organisation during the reference year?
Classification

1 Yes

2 No

9 Not known or not reported

Guide for use

Collaborative arrangements, sometimes known as ‘twinning’ are agreements between a WCPT member organisation and another national physical therapy professional association (either a WCPT member organisation or a physical therapist professional organisation in development); with mutual benefit the desired outcome.

  • This is a compulsory item, the response to which will appear on the WCPT member organisation profile page.
  • Select Yes (1) if there was a collaborative arrangement between the WCPT member organisation and another physical therapist professional organisation during the reference year.
  • Select No (2 ) if there was NO collaborative arrangement between the WCPT member organisation and another physical therapist professional organisation during the reference year.
  • 9 will be used where there is no response to alternative codes.
Why is this data item collected? WCPT can monitor the range of collaborative arrangements that exist and potentially harness the experience of one collaborative arrangement to the benefit of others.

 

11.2. Collaborative arrangement - additional information
Defined as Additional information about a collaborative arrangement the member organisation is currently in with another member organisation.
Question List the partner organisations and describe the policy, research, education and practice activities; undertaken in collaboration.
Classification

Free text.

Guide for use

Collaborative arrangements, sometimes known as ‘twinning’ are agreements between a WCPT member organisation and another national physical therapy professional association (either a WCPT member organisation or a physical therapist professional organisation in development); with mutual benefit the desired outcome.

  • Information should include the name of the partner organisation(s), the goal of the collaboration (policy, research, education, practice) and the activities undertaken.
Why is this data item collected? WCPT can monitor the range of collaborative arrangements that exist and potentially harness the experience of one collaborative arrangement to the benefit of others.

 

12.1. Programme offering entry level physical therapist education - number, X (3)
Defined as A number representing the count of programmes of study that result in a person being able to practise as a physical therapist that are recognised by the WCPT member organisation.
Question What is the number of programmes offering physical therapist professional entry level education recognised/acknowledged by the WCPT member organisation?
Classification

A number between 0 and 999 representing the total number of programmes offered in the country of the WCPT member organisation.

Guide for use
  • An entry level programme is a course of study that results in the person being able to practise as a physical therapist. Some academic institutions may offer more than one entry level programme, for example a 4 year Bachelor's programme as well as a 2 year Master's entry level programme for those who have done a relevant Bachelor's degree.
  • Programmes that are officially recognised or accredited by an accreditation agency are assumed to be recognised by the WCPT member organisation.
  • This is a compulsory item, the response to which will appear on the WCPT member organisation profile page.
  • This number contains a maximum of 3 digits between 0 and 999.
  • 0 is a valid entry where the country of the member organisation does not have any programmes for physical therapy education.
  • Individual institutions may operate more than one programme that enables people to practise as a physical therapist, for example part-time and full-time programs, or bachelors and masters entry level programmes. Each of these programmes should be counted separately.
  • Where an internship is required before the person can practise independently, this is considered as part of the entry level course of study, even if administered separately.
  • Entry level programmes may also be known as ‘qualifying programmes’, or basic level programmes.
Why is this data item collected? This item will demonstrate the potential of the profession to sustain itself as well as increase the number of professionals educated to practise, potentially to fill areas of low or unmet need for physical therapy.

 

12.2. Review of listing of physical therapist professional entry level education programmes - indicator Yes/No
Defined as An indicator that the WCPT member organisation confirms that information held on the WCPT website has been reviewed and is accurate.
Question Please review the information WCPT currently publishes on its website. Is this information accurate?
Classification

Yes

No

Guide for use
  • This item is relevant only to countries where there are physical therapist professional entry level education programmes,
  • WCPT currently publishes on its website at www.wcpt.org/node/33154, a listing of physical therapist professional entry level education programmes in the countries of its member organisations. An annual check that the information is accurate should be carried out
  • If the information is not accurate contact info@wcpt.org to arrange having this information updated.
Why is this data item collected? In order to maintain accurate and current data on the website WCPT member organisations are asked to review the information. This data item is collected to assist the secretariat to monitor the currency of information holdings.

 

12.3. Programme offering entry level physical therapist education - indicator of non-recognised programmes Yes/No
Defined as An indicator of the existence of programmes of study that result in a person being able to practise as a physical therapist that are not recognised by the WCPT member organisation.
Question Are there programmes offering physical therapist professional entry level education that are NOT recognised by the WCPT member organisation?
Classification
  1. Yes
  2. No
  3. Not known or not reported
Guide for use
  • This is a compulsory item
  • Select Yes (1) if there are programmes offering entry level physical therapist education that are not recognised by the WCPT member organisation.
  • Select No (2) if either there are no entry level physical therapist education programmes in the country or all programmes offered are recognised by the WCPT member organisation.
  • Programmes that are officially recognised or accredited by an accreditation agency are assumed to be recognised by the WCPT member organisation.
Why is this data item collected? This item will enable WCPT to monitor and advocate for quality of professional entry level education programmes.

 

12.3.2 Programme offering entry level physical therapist education - additional information on non-recognised programmes
Defined as Description of programmes of study that result in a person being able to practise as a physical therapist that are not recognised by the WCPT member organisation.
Question Information about the programme(s) and the reason they are not recognised
Classification

Free text

Guide for use
  • Include contact details of the programmes (See 6.2 for further information about contact details)
  • A reason why the programme is no recognised should be included.  Reasons might include the duration of the programme, the curriculum of study, the level of qualification of the faculty members, the level of skills of graduates of the programme, the facilities offered to students.
  • Any additional information which might enable WCPT to monitor and advocate for quality physical therapist professional entry level education should be included. 
Why is this data item collected? This item will enable WCPT to monitor and advocate for quality of professional entry level education programmes.

 

13.1. Education level - minimum for admission into an entry level physical therapy programme (x)
Defined as The educational level that is required before a person will be admitted to a programme of education intended to enable the person to work as a physical therapist.
Question In your country what is the MINIMUM level of education to gain entry to a physical therapist professional entry level programme.
Classification

1 Upper secondary

2 Diploma

3 Graduate diploma (eg PGD, Grad.Dip. Phys)

4 Bachelor's degree (eg BSc, BPhty)

5 Master's degree (eg MSc, MPT)

Guide for use
  • This is a compulsory item, the response to which will appear on the WCPT member organisation profile page.
  • Consider the minimum level of education that is required before a person will be admitted to a programme of education intended to enable the person to practise as a physical therapist in your country.
  • Entry level of education required may be based on years of full time school education, achievement of entry examinations, eg school leaving examinations for Bachelor’s professional entry level programmes or successful completion of a programme of education, such as a Bachelor’s degree for Master’s professional entry level programmes.
  • Match the criteria to the description that most accurately matches the situation in your country.

1.  Upper secondary - typically begins at the end of full-time compulsory education for those countries that have a system of compulsory education. More specialisation may be observed at this level than at lower secondary level and often teachers need to be more qualified or specialised. The entrance age to this level is typically 15 or 16 years. The typical entrance qualifications are some nine years of full-time education since the beginning of school and the minimum entrance requirements completion of compulsory schooling.

2.  Diploma - typically prepares students for entry to degree level studies for those who have not followed an upper secondary level curriculum that allows direct access to a degree programme. Entry to diploma programmes generally requires completion of upper secondary education. The programme content can be expected to be more specialised or detailed than those offered at the upper secondary level and this is irrespective of the institutional setting of the programme. The students are typically older than those in upper secondary programmes.  The type of subsequent education can be subdivided into:

  • those that prepare for entry into a degree programme; and
  • programmes that are primarily designed for direct labour market entry

The cumulative duration of the programme is considered from the beginning of upper secondary education and is typically between two and four years. The orientation of the programme is pre-vocational or pre-technical education, and vocational or technical education.

3.  Graduate diploma - is a tertiary programme covering a wide range of specialised needs following an undergraduate or postgraduate programme or relevant prior work, ranging from initial and ongoing professional development to preparation for further postgraduate study, including research higher degrees. The learning outcomes reflect a standard appropriate to a graduate intake and may include the acquisition and critical application of knowledge and skills in a new discipline or professional area, which may also involve extending knowledge and skills already gained in an undergraduate programme or relevant prior work; and further specialisation within a systematic and coherent body of knowledge.

Students may enter a graduate diploma programme under various arrangements, such as: directly from a bachelor degree; or from a diploma together with extensive and relevant prior experience demonstrating potential to undertake work at this level.

Although the duration of programmes may vary, programmes at this level typically require one year of full-time study. The graduate diploma may be articulated to a course work master’s degree and may be given credit towards the master’s degree.

4.  Bachelor's degree - is an academic degree granted to individuals who have undergone study demonstrating acquisition of a systematic and coherent body of knowledge, the underlying principles and concepts, and the associated communication and problem-solving skills; development of the academic skills and attributes necessary to undertake research, comprehend and evaluate new information, concepts and evidence from a range of sources; development of the ability to review, consolidate, extend and apply the knowledge and techniques learnt, including in a professional context; a foundation for self-directed and lifelong learning; interpersonal and teamwork skills appropriate to employment and/or further study.

A programme leading to this qualification also usually involves major studies in which significant literature is available. Programme content is taken to a significant depth and progressively developed to a high level which provides a basis for postgraduate study and professional careers.

5.  Master's degree - is an academic degree granted to individuals who have undergone study demonstrating a mastery or high-order overview of a specific field of study or area of professional practise. Within the area studied, graduates possess advanced knowledge of a specialised body of theoretical and applied topics; high order skills in analysis, critical evaluation and/or professional application; and the ability to solve complex problems and think rigorously and independently.

The International Standard Classification of Educationand the Australian Qualifications Frameworkhave been used as the basis of the descriptions of educational level. Matching the educational levels in the country of the WCPT member organisations to these concise descriptions will enable comparisons across countries, professions (also using ISCED classifications) and time.

Why is this data item collected?

There are a variety of programmes preparing people to practise as a physical therapist. Some programmes admit students straight from secondary school; others require bachelor’s or master’s level qualifications before admission to entry level physical therapy education. In order to compare educational level of entry across countries it is necessary to be able to relate the data. The International Standard Classification of Education2 is the world standard for this purpose.

Data collected will inform about the changing nature of physical therapy entry level programmes.

2. United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (1997) International Standard Classification of Education (ISCED) Paris: UNESCO.

 

13.2. Education level - level on completion of an entry level physical therapy programme (x)
Defined as The educational level that is achieved on completion of an entry level physical therapy programme.
Question In your country what is the MINIMUM level of education on completion of a physical therapist entry level programme?
Classification

1 Diploma

2 Graduate diploma (eg PGD, Grad.Dip. Phys)

3 Bachelor's degree (eg BSc, BPhty)

4 Master's degree (eg MSc, MPT)

5 Professional doctorate (eg DPT)

Guide for use
  • This is a compulsory item, the response to which will appear on the WCPT member organisation profile page.
  • Consider the minimum level of education that is achieved on completion of a programme of education intended to enable the person to practise as a physical therapist in your country.
  • Match the criteria to the description that most accurately matches the situation in your country.

1.  Diploma - typically prepares students for entry to degree level studies for those who have not followed an upper secondary level curriculum that allows direct access to a degree programme. Entry to diploma programmes generally requires completion of upper secondary education. The programme content can be expected to be more specialised or detailed than those offered at the upper secondary level and this is irrespective of the institutional setting of the programme. The students are typically older than those in upper secondary programmes.

The type of subsequent education can be subdivided into::

  • those that prepare for entry into a degree programme; and
  • programmes that are primarily designed for direct labour market entry

The cumulative duration of the programme is considered from the beginning of upper secondary education and is typically between two and four years. The orientation of the programme is pre-vocational or pre-technical education and vocational or technical education.

2.  Graduate diploma - is a tertiary programme covering a wide range of specialised needs following an undergraduate or postgraduate programme or relevant prior work, ranging from initial and ongoing professional development to preparation for further postgraduate study, including research higher degrees. The learning outcomes reflect a standard appropriate to a graduate intake and may include the acquisition and critical application of knowledge and skills in a new discipline or professional area, which may also involve extending knowledge and skills already gained in an undergraduate programme or relevant prior work; and further specialisation within a systematic and coherent body of knowledge.

Students may enter a graduate diploma programme under various arrangements, such as: directly from a bachelor degree; or from a diploma together with extensive and relevant prior experience demonstrating potential to undertake work at this level.

Although the duration of programmes may vary, programmes at this level typically require one year of full-time study. The graduate diploma may be articulated to a course work master’s degree and may be given credit towards the master’s degree.

3.  Bachelor's degree - is an academic degree granted to individuals who have undergone study demonstrating acquisition of a systematic and coherent body of knowledge, the underlying principles and concepts, and the associated communication and problem-solving skills; development of the academic skills and attributes necessary to undertake research, comprehend and evaluate new information, concepts and evidence from a range of sources; development of the ability to review, consolidate, extend and apply the knowledge and techniques learnt, including in a professional context; a foundation for self-directed and lifelong learning; interpersonal and teamwork skills appropriate to employment and/or further study.

A programme leading to this qualification also usually involves major studies in which significant literature is available. Programme content is taken to a significant depth and progressively developed to a high level which provides a basis for postgraduate study and professional careers..

4.  Master's degree - is an academic degree granted to individuals who have undergone study demonstrating a mastery or high-order overview of a specific field of study or area of professional practise. Within the area studied, graduates possess advanced knowledge of a specialised body of theoretical and applied topics; high order skills in analysis, critical evaluation and/or professional application; and the ability to solve complex problems and think rigorously and independently.

5. Professional doctorate- is a programme preparing students who already hold a bachelor’s degree in a field other than physical therapy to enter the practice of physical therapy. The programme is typically three years full time study. Professional or clinical doctorate programmes may also be offered to physical therapy professionals with the intention of providing advanced knowledge and skills, usually in a specific specialty area, such programmes may be completed in a shorter time. The orientation of the programme may either extend physical therapist expertise or develop research skills.

The International Standard Classification of Educationand the Australian Qualifications Frameworkhave been used as the basis of the descriptions of educational level. Matching the educational levels in the country of the WCPT member organisations to these concise descriptions will enable comparisons across countries, professions (also using ISCED classifications) and time.

Why is this data item collected?

This item will be used to monitor changes in the basic level of attainment of the profession.

 

13.3. Physical therapist professional entry level physical therapy programmes - years of full time study, number N.[NN]
Defined as The number of years of study required for completion of a recognised physical therapy professional entry level educational programme.
Question How many full time equivalent years of education in the MINIMUM physical therapist professional entry level education?
Classification

Total number N.N[N], maximum character length 3

Unit of measure – years.
Guide for use
  • This is a compulsory item, the response to which will appear on the WCPT member organisation profile page.
  • A number between 0 and 9.9 representing the total number of years required to complete a recognised physical therapist professional entry level programme. 
  • Where a programme takes part of a year round to the nearest quarter. For example a programme lasting 3 years and 9 months would be recorded 3.75.
  • Where an internship or clinical practicum is required following the programme and before eligible to enter independent practice add the length of this component of the programme to the years of academic study. For example the academic component of a programme is 3 years and 6 months and an internship of 6 months is required; the programme full time equivalent in years would be 4.
  • This data item may be applied to both minimum entry level programmes and other levels of education.
  • Where there is variation in the number of years it takes to complete a programme enter the number that represents the majority.
  • It is recognised that some programmes are completed part-time. The years to complete part time programmes should be full time equivalent. For example a programme that takes four years of half time study would be recorded as 2 years full time equivalent.

The source of this number may be:

  • The educational institutions where entry level physical therapy courses are conducted.
  • Accreditation agencies.
  • Clearinghouses where all students apply for entry to academic programmes.
Why is this data item collected?

For WCPT to represent an accurate picture of the profession, potential workforce numbers and qualifications are important data.  Knowing the duration of physical therapist professional entry level programmes will assist with workforce planning and advocacy.

 

14.1. Physical therapist professional entry level programmes - more than one level of entry indicator
Defined as An indicator of whether there is more than one level of education for physical therapist professional entry level programmes.
Question For physical therapist professional entry level programmes, is there more than one entry level and/or qualification level?
Classification

1 Yes, there is more than one level

2 No, there is only one level of education

9 Not known or not reported

Guide for use
  • This is a compulsory item.
  • Use Yes (1) where students may enter a physical therapist professional entry level programme with different educational requirements. For example; upper secondary level education entry to a bachelor’s programme and a bachelor’s level education for entry to a master’s professional entry level education. . 
  • Use No (2) where there is either no education programmes at all or only a single educational level for entry.
  • If it is not known whether there is more than one level of education of physical therapist professional entry level education use 9.
Why is this data item collected?

For WCPT to represent an accurate picture of profession,  entry level of education and qualifications are important data.  This data item will enable WCPT to monitor the changing levels over time.

 

14.1.2. Physical therapist professional entry level programmes - entry and exit levels of education, all
Defined as Education levels on entry and on completion of physical therapist professional entry level programmes.
Question Specify entry level of education and level of education on completion of each of the different programme types.
Classification

1 Upper secondary (eg school leaving certificate)

2 Diploma (eg Dip T)

3 Graduate diploma (eg PGD, Grad.Dip. Phys)

4 Bachelor’s degree (eg BSc, BPhty)

5 Master’s degree (eg MSc, MPT)

6 Professional doctorate (eg DPT)

7 None

Guide for use
  • This item only refers to physical therapists professional entry level education programmes
  • Consider the exit levels of education that are achieved to enable the person to work as a physical therapist in your country and record all that apply for each entry level of education. For example; if both Master’s and professional doctorate qualifications are the exit levels of education from a Bachelor’s entry level record both.

1. Upper secondary - typically begins at the end of full-time compulsory education for those countries that have a system of compulsory education. More specialisation may be observed at this level than at lower secondary level and often teachers need to be more qualified or specialised. The entrance age to this level is typically 15 or 16 years. The typical entrance qualifications are some nine years of full-time education since the beginning of school and the minimum entrance requirements completion of compulsory schooling.

2. Diploma - typically prepares students for entry to degree level studies for those who have not followed an upper secondary level curriculum that allows direct access to a degree programme. Entry to diploma programmes generally requires completion of upper secondary education. The programme content can be expected to be more specialised or detailed than those offered at the upper secondary level and this is irrespective of the institutional setting of the programme. The students are typically older than those in upper secondary programmes.  The type of subsequent education can be subdivided into:

  • those that prepare for entry into a degree programme; and
  • programmes that are primarily designed for direct labour market entry

The cumulative duration of the programme is considered from the beginning of upper secondary education and is typically between two and four years. The orientation of the programme is pre-vocational or pre-technical education and vocational or technical education.

3. Graduate diploma - is a tertiary programme covering a wide range of specialised needs following an undergraduate or postgraduate programme or relevant prior work, ranging from initial and ongoing professional development to preparation for further postgraduate study, including research higher degrees. The learning outcomes reflect a standard appropriate to a graduate intake and may include the acquisition and critical application of knowledge and skills in a new discipline or professional area, which may also involve extending knowledge and skills already gained in an undergraduate programme or relevant prior work; and further specialisation within a systematic and coherent body of knowledge.

Students may enter a graduate diploma programme under various arrangements, such as: directly from a bachelor degree; or from a diploma together with extensive and relevant prior experience demonstrating potential to undertake work at this level.

Although the duration of programmes may vary, programmes at this level typically require one year of full-time study. The graduate diploma may be articulated to a course work master’s degree and may be given credit towards the master’s degree.

4. Bachelor's degree - is an academic degree granted to individuals who have undergone study demonstrating acquisition of a systematic and coherent body of knowledge, the underlying principles and concepts, and the associated communication and problem-solving skills; development of the academic skills and attributes necessary to undertake research, comprehend and evaluate new information, concepts and evidence from a range of sources; development of the ability to review, consolidate, extend and apply the knowledge and techniques learnt, including in a professional context; a foundation for self-directed and lifelong learning; interpersonal and teamwork skills appropriate to employment and/or further study.

A programme leading to this qualification also usually involves major studies in which significant literature is available. Programme content is taken to a significant depth and progressively developed to a high level which provides a basis for postgraduate study and professional careers.

5. Master's degree - is an academic degree granted to individuals who have undergone study demonstrating a mastery or high-order overview of a specific field of study or area of professional practise. Within the area studied, graduates possess advanced knowledge of a specialised body of theoretical and applied topics; high order skills in analysis, critical evaluation and/or professional application; and the ability to solve complex problems and think rigorously and independently.

6. Professional doctorate - is a programme preparing students who already hold a bachelor’s degree in a field other than physical therapy to enter the practice of physical therapy. The programme is typically three years full time study. Professional or clinical doctorate programmes may also be offered to physical therapy professionals with the intention of providing advanced knowledge and skills, usually in a specific specialty area, such programmes may be completed in a shorter time. The orientation of the programme may either extend physical therapist expertise or develop research skills.

The International Standard Classification of Educationand the Australian Qualifications Framework have been used as the basis of the descriptions of educational level. Matching the educational levels in the country of the WCPT member organisations to these concise descriptions will enable comparisons across countries, professions (also using ISCED classifications) and time.

Why is this data item collected?

For WCPT to represent an accurate picture of the profession, entry level of education and qualifications are important data.  This data item will enable WCPT to monitor the changing levels over time.

 

15.1. Physical therapist professional entry level physical therapy programmes - student places, number N[NNNN]
Defined as The number of places for students in recognised physical therapy professional entry level educational programmes in the reference year.
Question What is the total capacity of all physical therapist professional entry level education programmes in the country?  ie. the number of student places for physical therapist professional entry level education in the reference year?
Classification

Total number N[NNNN], maximum character length 5

Unit of measure – places in intake year of courses of study.
Guide for use
  • A number between 0 and 99999 representing the total number of places available in the intake year of recognised physical therapist professional entry level programmes.
  • The source of this number may be:
    • by summing the number of places at each of the educational institutions where entry level physical therapy courses are conducted;
    • clearinghouses where all students apply for entry to academic programmes
  • Enter 0 if the number is not known
Why is this data item collected?

For WCPT to represent an accurate picture of the profession, potential workforce numbers and qualifications are important data.  Knowing the number of places for educating physical therapists will assist with workforce planning and advocacy.

 

 

15.2. Physical therapist professional entry level physical therapy programmes - successful completions, number N[NNNN]
Defined as The number of people who successfully complete a recognised physical therapist professional entry level educational programme in the country in the reference year.
Question What is the total number of people who successfully completed a recognised physical therapist professional entry level education programme in your country in the reference year?
Classification

Total number N[NNNN], maximum character length 5

Unit of measure – people.
Guide for use
  • A number between 0 and 99999 representing the total number of students successfully completing recognised physical therapist professional entry level programmes in the country in the reference year.
  • 0 is a valid number where there are no student physical therapists in the country in the reference year.
  • Where an internship or clinical practicum is required following the academic programme and before eligible to enter independent practice students should only be counted on completion of the requirements for entry into the profession.
  • The source of this number may be:
    • by summing the number of successful students from each of the educational institutions where entry level physical therapy courses are conducted;
    • registration authorities where registration is a requirement for practise following completion of a programme;
    • new registrations on registers of members of the WCPT member organisation, where membership is a requirement for practise following completion of a programme.
Why is this data item collected?

For WCPT to represent an accurate picture of the profession, potential workforce numbers and qualifications are important data.  Knowing the number of successful completions of physical therapist professional entry level programmes will assist with workforce planning and advocacy.

 

16.1. Member organisation - special interest groups recognised
Defined as The types of degrees available in the country for post professional education 
Question Which levels of physical therapist specific post professional degree programmes are available in the country?
Classification
  1. None
  2. Graduate diploma (eg PGD, Grad Dip, Phys]
  3. Bachelor’s degree [eg BSc, BPhty]
  4. Master’s degree [eg MSc, MPT]
  5. Professional doctorate [eg DPT]
  6. Research doctorate (eg PhD)
Guide for use
  • Physical therapist post professional education programmes are those specifically for physical therapists, which may only be undertaken after entry to the profession.
  • For descriptions of the education levels go to item 13.1.
  • Excluded are advanced levels of education in subjects associated with physical therapy such as education, business administration, health service administration, ergonomics and biomechanics amongst others.
  • All types of degrees available in the country should be checked
  • If there is no post professional degree programmes in the country enter None.
Why is this data item collected?

For WCPT to represent an accurate picture of the profession, types of physical therapist specific academic qualifications are important data.  Knowing the types of programmes available will assist with workforce planning and advocacy.

 

17.1. Member organisation - special interest groups recognised
Defined as The types of degrees available in the country for post professional education 
Question Which levels of physical therapist specific post professional degree programmes are available in the country?
Classification
  1. None
  2. Amputee rehabilitation
  3. Aquatics
  4. Acupuncture
  5. Animal practice
  6. Cardiorespiratory physical therapy
  7. Educators in physical therapy
  8. Electrophysical agents
  9. Health promotion
  10. Information management and technology
  11. Intellectual disability
  12. Management/administration
  13. Mental health
  1. Neurology
  2. Orthopaedics/manual therapy
  3. Occupational health and ergonomics
  4. Older people
  5. Oncology/palliative care
  6. Pain
  7. Paediatrics
  8. Policy
  9. Private practitioners
  10. Sports physical therapy
  11. Women's health
  12. Other
Guide for use
  • Physical therapist specialisation is defined as 'the application of advanced clinical competence by a physical therapist qualified in a defined area within the scope of practice recognised as physical therapy.
  • Formal programmes of specialisation are structured career paths which may involve academic study, continuing professional development courses, self directed study, supervised practice, clinical and oral examinations. Generally the programme is taken in conjunction with clinical practice in the area of specialisation.
  • Formal programmes may be run by the member organisation or by a recognised national special interest group or a WCPT subgroup for example IFOMPT
  • All areas of practice where there is a formal specialisation programme in the country should be checked.
  • If there is a programme of specialisation in an area of practice not listed enter in Other
  • If there are no programmes of specialisation in the country enter None
Why is this data item collected?

For WCPT to represent an accurate picture of the profession, types of physical therapist specific academic qualifications are important data.  Knowing the types of programmes available will assist with workforce planning and advocacy.

 

18.1. Physical therapy practice - scope of practice definition, agency type
Defined as The agency responsible for defining physical therapist scope of practice.
Question The scope of practice of physical therapists is defined by: 
Classification

1 Ministry of Health or another government department

2 One or more independent licensing/registration authorities

3 WCPT member organisation

4 A partnership between a registration body and the WCPT member organisation

5 Not defined

6 Other (please specify)

Guide for use
  • This is a compulsory item, the response to which will appear on the WCPT member organisation profile page.
  • Select the description that most closely represents the situation in your country. 
  • Where there are different responses for different regions of a country, select the response that represents the situation for the majority.
  • If the situation in the country is not included in the options 1-5 use option 6 and describe the situation. Include information about the name of the agency, web address and any details that would assist the WCPT secretariat to understand the situation in the country.
Why is this data item collected?

Physical therapist scope of practice is expressed in the WCPT description of physical therapy. WCPT advocates that the profession of physical therapy is responsible for articulating the profession’s scope of practice and defining the roles of physical therapists. However this is not the case in every country. This data item enables WCPT to monitor the state of regulation of physical therapist professional practice, make comparisons over time and make regional and international comparisons.

 

18.2.1. Physical therapist - educate to enable first contact/autonomous practice, indicator
Defined as An indicator of whether professional entry level programmes educate physical therapists to be autonomous practitioners.
Question Do professional entry level programmes in the country educate physical therapists to be first contact/autonomous practitioners?
Classification

1 Yes, all programmes

2 Yes, some programmes

3 No

4 Not applicable, there are no physical therapist professional entry level programmes in the country

9 Not known or not reported

Guide for use

A first contact practitioner is a professional person to whom the patient/client may directly access as first contact. Autonomy is the ability of a reflective practitioner to make independent judgments; open to initiate, terminate, or alter physical therapy intervention.

Physical therapists who are first contact/autonomous practitioners are able to see patients/clients without the requirement of a referral from another health professional. Patients/clients can refer themselves and physical therapists can determine those who can benefit from physical therapy.

  • If professional entry level programmes educate physical therapists to be first contact/autonomous practitioners respond yes, indicating whether all or only some of the programmes teach to this level.
  • Otherwise respond No.
  • If there are no physical therapist professional entry level programmes in the country respond not applicable.
  • 9 will be used where the relevant information is not known.
Why is this data item collected?

WCPT believes that physical therapists, as autonomous professionals, should have the freedom to exercise their professional judgment and decision making, wherever they practise, so long as this is within the physical therapist's knowledge, competence and scope of practice.

WCPT advocates for the right of users of physical therapy services to self-refer to services if they so desire and believes that this right promotes the autonomy of users of physical therapy services and enables fair and equitable access to such services.

WCPT advocates for health insurance reimbursement models that do not require the referral of a medical practitioner before a patient/client may seek the services of a physical therapist.

This data item will enable WCPT to monitor the impact of its policies on direct access and professional autonomy.

 

18.3. Physical therapy practice - direct access indicator
Defined as An indicator that direct access to the services of a physical therapist is an accepted form of practice in a country.
Question In the country are service users able to refer themselves to a physical therapist without a medical/physician referral?
Classification

1 Yes

2 No

9 Not known or reported

Guide for use

Direct access is used to describe the situation where the patient/client directly asks the physical therapist to provide services (the patient refers themselves) and the physical therapist freely decides his conduct and takes full responsibility for it. Also where the physical therapist has direct access to patients/clients and determines those that need a physical therapy assessment/intervention without referral from a third party.

  • This is a compulsory item, the response to which will appear on the WCPT member organisation profile page.
  • Use 1 where direct contact between a patient and a physical therapist is permitted.
  • Use 2 where direct access to a physical therapist is restricted by legislation, regulation or custom; ie usual working practices require that a referral is provided before a physical therapist provides services to a person needing them.
  • 9 will be used where there is insufficient information to use alternatives.
  • Where there are different responses for different regions of a country, select the response that represents the situation for the majority of the population.
Why is this data item collected?

Physical therapists are educated to be autonomous practitioners, responsible for the conduct of their own practice. However in some jurisdictions it is not permitted under law or regulation to work without a referral from another health professional, usually a physician.

Sometimes the need for a referral is not mandatory, but required in some service settings as a means of managing through put of service users. Sometimes referral practices are neither mandated nor required but the customary way of working, for example in multi-professional teams.

WCPT will use this data item to monitor the extent of autonomy of the profession around the world. Information about autonomous practice may inform health and social welfare policy in relation to cost-effective care pathways.

 

18.4. Physical therapy practice - permitted actions, indicator
Defined as An indicator of the actions that a physical therapist is permitted to undertake in a country.
Question

In the country are physical therapists permitted to: 

1 act as first contact/autonomous practitioners?

2 assess patients/clients?

3 make a diagnosis?

4 treat (interventions, advice & evaluation of outcome)?

5 refer to other specialists/services?

6 offer preventive advice/services?

Classification

1 Action permitted – box checked

2 Action is not permitted – box clear

Guide for use
  • This is a compulsory item.
  • Check each of the actions in the question that are permitted in your country. 
  • Leave box blank where the action is not permitted.
  • Where there are different responses for different regions of a country or different practice situations, select the response that represents the situation for the majority.
Why is this data item collected?

Physical therapists are educated to be autonomous practitioners, responsible for the conduct of their own practice. However in some jurisdictions some actions are not permitted under law or regulation.

WCPT will use this data item to monitor the extent of autonomy of the profession around the world. Information about autonomous practice may inform health and social welfare policy in relation to cost-effective care pathways.

 

19.1. Private practice - legal status indicator, Yes/No
Defined as The status in relation to the presence of legislation governing the ability of physical therapists to establish their own independent private practice.
Question

Is there legislation preventing physical therapists from establishing their own independent private practice within the health system of the country?

Classification

Yes

No

Guide for use
  • Private practice is the independent practice of physical therapy; generally in settings that are not funded by governments.
  • Private practitioners may be contracted by governments to provide services in publically funded facilities.
  • Private practitioners include for example independently owned and managed consulting rooms (individual and partnerships), privately owned and administered not for profit or for profit hospitals, rehabilitation centres, sports clubs, workplace clinics and businesses selling physical therapy advice and services on the internet.
  • Use Yes where there is legislation preventing physical therapists from establishing their own independent private practice.
  • Use No where there is no legislation preventing physical therapists from establishing their own independent private practice.#
  • Where there legislation varies across the country specify the situation for the majority.
Why is this data item collected?

Physical therapists as autonomous practitioners should be allowed to engage in private practice, free of restrictions imposed by other professions on how they should practise. This item enables the status of the profession in relation to restrictions on private practice.

 

20.1. Physical therapy practice - permitted actions, indicator
Defined as The source of revenue received by the physical therapist relevant organisation
Question

How are physical therapist services funded…

Classification
  1. Personal out of pocket payments
  2. Private or voluntary insurance premiums
  3. Public tax funded system
  4. Compulsory insurance premiums
  5. Other
Guide for use

Health financing systems mobilise and allocate money, within the health system, to meet the current health needs of the population (individual and collective), with a view to expected future needs. Individuals may have access to care by means of direct payment for services and goods or through third-party financing arrangements, such as with a National Health Service, social insurance or voluntary insurance.

  • Personal out of pocket payments: the reimbursement for services is paid by the recipient of services or on behalf of the recipient of services by family member or another. Funds may be in cash, cheque, credit card payment, bank transfer for example. Compulsory medical savings accounts are a form of out of pocket payment. Includes cost sharing and informal payments made to service providers. Cost sharing can be the form of co payments with health insurance payment.
  • Private or voluntary insurance premiums: coverage of individuals or groups is at the discretion of individuals or firms (e.g. individual- or group-based voluntary health insurance). The basis for benefit entitlement refers to the general conditions (basic rules) for access to care under the different financing schemes. An individual’s access to health services may be:
    • non-contributory: defined by constitution or law (citizens/residents, or defined individuals or groups within the country) and not linked to a specific contribution payment; or
    • contributory: defined by law/government regulation and requires a contribution payment made by or on behalf of the covered individual (e.g. social health insurance).
    Premiums are usually non-income related (often directly or indirectly risk related). Government may directly or indirectly (e.g.tax credits) subsidise.
  • Public tax funded system: the payment for health services is made through budget revenues (primarily taxes). The schemes are for all citizens/residents or a specific group of the population (e.g. the poor) defined by law/government regulation. Benefits are typically universal or available for a specific population group. Includes social security programmes in which the payment for health services is complementary to the main types of benefits, such as pension and unemployment benefits. These social security schemes may not be labelled as health insurance in the national practice of the countries concerned.
  • Compulsory insurance premiums: A financing scheme established by a specific public law with the purpose of providing protection against the financial risks of ill-health for the society as a whole, or for specific groups in society (employed persons, the most vulnerable groups, etc.). The operation of the financing scheme is also regulated by public law. Compulsory insurance schemes may be operated by private insurance companies. The day-to-day operation of the financing scheme may be regulated under private law (e.g. compulsory private health insurance in the Netherlands).
  • This item is compulsory and the data will be displayed on the WCPT website.
  • This item may be applied to 20.1 and 20.2
  • More than one field may be selected.
  • Where there funding schema vary across the country specify the situation which most accurately represents the situation in the country.
  • If the health financing scheme in the country cannot be described using the categories provide a brief description of the funding scheme as Other. Other might include: Donations from the general public, governments (budget of national government or foreign aid) or corporations and enterprise financing schemes.
  • For further information see OECD, Eurostat, WHO A System of Health Accounts 2011 Edition.OECD Publishing
Why is this data item collected?

Health financing schemes are the building blocks of the structure of a country’s health financing system. They are the main types of financing arrangements through which people can get access to health services. This item will enable WCPT to monitor the schemes for funding physical therapy services across the world. In future it may be possible analyse health financing schemes in relation to access to physical therapist services. 

 

21.1. Physical therapy practice - direct access indicator, Yes/No
Defined as An indicator that direct access to the services of a physical therapist is an accepted form of practice in a country
Question

Will private insurance reimburse…

Classification
  1. In full
  2. In part
  3. No
Guide for use
  • Private practice is the independent practice of physical therapy; generally in settings that are not funded by governments
  • Private practitioners may be contracted by governments to provide services in publically funded facilities.
  • Private practitioners include for example independently owned and managed consulting rooms (individual and partnerships), privately owned and administered not for profit or for profit hospitals, rehabilitation centres, sports clubs, workplace clinics and businesses selling physical therapy advice and services on the internet.
  • Use In full where the full cost of physical therapist services is reimbursed.
  • Use In part where some of the cost of physical therapist services is reimbursed.
  • Use No where none of the costs of physical therapist services is reimbursed.
  • Where there is variation across the country specify the situation for the majority. 
Why is this data item collected?

Information about funding of physical therapist services can be used for advocacy.

 

22.1. Standards of practice - status indicator, Yes/No
Defined as An indicator of whether standards of physical therapy practice are specified in the country of the WCPT member organisation.
Question

Is physical therapist practice guided by specified standards of practice?

Classification

1.1 Yes, standard of the regulatory authority

1.2 Yes, WCPT member organisation specific standard

1.3 Yes, WCPT standard

1.4 Yes, more than one standard

2 No

9 Not known or not reported

Guide for use
  • This is a compulsory item, the response to which will appear on the WCPT member organisation profile page.
  • Use 1 where there is a specific code of practice; selecting according to the source of the standard document.
  • Select 1.4 if there is more than one standard.
  • Use No (2) where there is no standard of practice for physical therapy in the country.
  • 9 will be used where information is not available and 1 & 2 are not used.
Why is this data item collected?

Standards of practice are a necessary and important guiding document for any professional association.  Information about the use of standards of practice enables WCPT to monitor the development of the profession globally and to advocate for the profession in delivering quality physical therapy services.

WCPT collects this data item as a way of demonstrating that the profession is conscious of its responsibilities in maintaining professional standards.

 

23.1. Code of conduct - status indicator, Yes/No
Defined as An indicator of whether a document specifying the ethical practice of physical therapy is used in the country of the WCPT member organisation.
Question

Is a code of conduct specified by the WCPT member organisation?

Classification

1.1 Yes, the code of conduct of the regulatory authority

1.2 Yes, WCPT member organisation specific code of conduct

1.3 Yes, WCPT ethical principles

1.4 Yes, more than one 

2 No

9 Not known or not reported

Guide for use

These documents might have various titles such as ‘Rules of professional conduct’, ‘Ethical guidelines’ ‘Code of ethics’, however the content should state the way in which physical therapists are expected to behave in the conduct of their profession.

  • This is a compulsory item, the response to which will appear on the WCPT member organisation profile page.
  • Use 1 where there is a specific code of conduct; selecting according to the source of the standard document.
  • Use 2 if no codes of conduct or ethical principles are in use.
  • 9 will be used where there is insufficient information and 1 & 2 are not used.
  • Where there are several codes of conduct used in the country specify the situation for the majority.
Why is this data item collected?

Codes of conduct or statements of ethical principles are necessary and important guiding documents for any professional association.  Information about the use of these documents enables WCPT to monitor the development of the profession and to advocate for the ethical conduct of the profession. WCPT collects this data item as a way of demonstrating that the profession is conscious of its responsibility to practise ethically.

 

24.1. Registration/licensing - legal requirement, Yes/No
Defined as An indicator of whether there is a legal requirement to enter the names on a register or to gain a licence to practise as a means of identifying appropriately qualified persons.
Question

Do physical therapists need to be registered/licensed by a national/regional body to practise in the country or certain regions of the country?

Classification

1 Yes 

2 No

9 Not known or not reported

Guide for use

Regulation of the profession - cluster of laws, regulations, directives or rules set by the authority to legislate the physical therapy profession. The regulation can also be in the form of self-regulation set by the physical therapy profession (WCPT member organisation).

Regulation provides the right to practise physical therapy to the appropriately qualified individuals under the appropriate legislative framework. The purpose of regulation is to protect the public from incompetent, unqualified or unethical practitioners.

Registration/licensing enables:

  • the public to find an appropriately qualified physical therapist
  • employers and managers to find out whether employees are currently registered
  • monitoring of compliance with the legislation on the use of protected titles
  • statistics about the profile of the profession for monitoring numbers and potential workforce

Demographic information, qualifications and information about fitness to practise are usually collected. Registration boards/councils may set the standards for training, professional skills and ethical behaviour. The registration/licensing office may be a good source of information about the profession in a country.

  • This is a compulsory item, the response to which will appear on the WCPT member organisation profile page.
  • Select Yes (1) if a register of persons who hold physical therapy qualifications approved by national professional associations is maintained or if a licence to practise is required under legislation.
  • Select No (2) if such a register/licensing process is NOT required under legislation.
  • 9 is used where there is insufficient information.
  • Where legislation is at a provincial, state or other regional/local level answer for the majority.
Why is this data item collected?

In its policy statement Regulation of the physical therapy profession WCPT advocates for regulation of the physical therapy profession through recognised and valued systems. These systems should assure protection of the public through mechanisms including responsible self-governance of physical therapists. This data item together with items 16.2 and 16.3 enable WCPT to describe the state of regulation across the world and to monitor changes in the state of regulation over time. Regional profiles of regulation may be generated.

 

24.2. Registration/licensing - alternative form
Defined as An indicator of whether there is a requirement to enter the names on a register or to gain a licence to practise as a means of identifying appropriately qualified persons.
Question

Is there any other form of regulation, such as rules or directions or regulation by the WCPT member organisation.

Classification

1 Yes 

2 No

9 Not known or not reported

Guide for use

Regulation of the profession - cluster of laws, regulations, directives or rules set by the authority to legislate the physical therapy profession. The regulation can also be in form of self-regulation set by the physical therapy profession (WCPT member organisation).

Regulation provides the right to practise physical therapy to the appropriately qualified individuals under the appropriate legislative framework. The purpose of regulation is to protect the public from incompetent, unqualified or unethical practitioners.

Registration/licensing enables:

  • the public to find an appropriately qualified physical therapist
  • employers and managers to find out whether employees are currently registered
  • monitoring of compliance with the legislation on the use of protected titles
  • statistics about the profile of the profession for monitoring numbers and potential workforce

Demographic information, qualifications and information about fitness to practise are usually collected. Registration boards/councils may set the standards for training, professional skills and ethical behaviour. The registration/licensing office may be a good source of information about the profession in a country.

  • Select Yes (1) if a register of persons who hold physical therapy qualifications approved by national professional associations is maintained or if a licence to practise is required under legislation.
  • Select No (2) if such a register/licensing process is NOT in place.
  • 9 is used where there is insufficient information.
  • Where legislation is at a provincial, state or other regional/local level answer for the majority.
Why is this data item collected?

In its policy statement Regulation of the physical therapy profession WCPT advocates for regulation of the physical therapy profession through recognised and valued systems. These systems should assure protection of the public through mechanisms including responsible self-governance of physical therapists. This data item together with items 16.1 and 16.3 enable WCPT to describe the state of regulation across the world and to monitor changes in the state of regulation over time. Regional profiles of regulation may be generated.

 

24.3. Registration/licensing - additional information
Defined as Description of the system of regulation in the country.
Question

Briefly describe the system of regulation in the country.

Classification

Free text.

Guide for use

Regulation of the profession - cluster of laws, regulations, directives or rules set by the authority to legislate the physical therapy profession. The regulation can also be in form of self-regulation set by the physical therapy profession (WCPT member organisation).

Regulation provides the right to practise physical therapy to the appropriately qualified individuals under the appropriate legislative framework. The purpose of regulation is to protect the public from incompetent, unqualified or unethical practitioners.

Registration/licensing enables:

  • the public to find an appropriately qualified physical therapist
  • employers and managers to find out whether employees are currently registered
  • monitoring of compliance with the legislation on the use of protected titles
  • statistics about the profile of the profession for monitoring numbers and potential workforce

Demographic information, qualifications and information about fitness to practise are usually collected. Registration boards/councils may set the standards for training, professional skills and ethical behaviour. The registration/licensing office may be a good source of information about the profession in a country.

A description of the system of regulation should include the name(s) of the agency (ies) responsible for regulation, web address (es) and/or the address (es) of the organisation(s).
Why is this data item collected?

In its policy statement Regulation of the physical therapy profession WCPT advocates for regulation of the physical therapy profession through recognised and valued systems. These systems should assure protection of the public through mechanisms including responsible self-governance of physical therapists. This data item together with items 16.1 and 16.3 enable WCPT to describe the state of regulation across the world and to monitor changes in the state of regulation over time. Regional profiles of regulation may be generated.

 

24.4. Registration/licensing - professional development required, Yes/No
Defined as An indicator of whether there is a requirement to provide evidence of continuous professional development as a condition of re-registration/licensing.
Question

Is evidence of continuing professional development required as a condition of re-registration/licensing?

Classification

1 Yes 

2 No

9 Not known or not reported

Guide for use

Continuous professional development (CPD) is a range of learning activities through which physical therapists maintain and develop skills throughout their career to ensure that they retain their capacity to practise safely, effectively and legally within their evolving scope of practice.

CPD may be a requirement of the registration/licensing organisation or the member organisation.

  • This is a compulsory item, the response to which will appear on the WCPT member organisation profile page.
  • If a condition of re-registering or keeping a licence to practise current is to show evidence of continuous professional development use Yes (1).
  • Use No (2) if there is no need to provide evidence of continuous professional development as part of the registration/licensing process.
  • Use 9 only if there is insufficient information on which to judge whether CPD is required as a condition of re-registration/licensing.
Why is this data item collected?

WCPT collects this data item as a way of demonstrating that the profession is conscious of its responsibilities to the public in maintaining professional competence.

 

24.5. Membership of the WCPT member organisation - professional development required, Yes/No
Defined as An indicator of whether there is a requirement to provide evidence of continuous professional development as a condition of membership and renewal in the WCPT member organisation.
Question

Is evidence of continuing professional development required as a condition of membership and renewal in the WCPT member organisation?

Classification

1 Yes 

2 No

9 Not known or not reported

Guide for use

Continuous professional development (CPD) is a range of learning activities through which physical therapists maintain and develop skills throughout their career to ensure that they retain their capacity to practise safely, effectively and legally within their evolving scope of practice.

CPD may be a requirement of the membership and renewal in the WCPT member organisation.

  • This is a compulsory item, the response to which will appear on the WCPT member organisation profile page.
  • If a condition of attaining and retaining membership of the WCPT member organisation is to show evidence of continuous professional development use Yes (1).
  • Use No (2) if there is no need to provide evidence of continuous professional development as part of the membership application and renewal process.
  • Use 9 only if there is insufficient information.
Why is this data item collected?

WCPT collects this data item as a way of demonstrating that the profession is conscious of its responsibilities to the public in maintaining professional competence.

Privacy and data principles for the WCPT CDS

The following privacy and data principles are drafted under three main headings: ethos, content and quality, methods and procedures.

Ethos

Respect: privacy, dignity and confidentiality

  • The common data set should be defined and collected in a climate of mutual respect.
  • All participants in the WCPT CDS collection should respect the rights to privacy and confidentiality of the data provider.
  • Member organisations and providers of information to member organisations should be respected for their role in providing a valued service and for their need to operate cost-effectively.

Fairness and transparency

Data should be collected in accordance with the privacy principles attached:

  • member organisations should ensure that their members are aware of the data being recorded, the purpose of recording, and which data will be transmitted to WCPT, and for what purpose
  • member organisations have the right to access their own record and to update or correct information included in the WCPT CDS collection
  • member organisations should be made aware of their right to seek access to their record and to correct or update information about the organisation, if it is incomplete, inaccurate or out-of-date
  • fairness and openness concerning purposes, data, procedures and release. WCPT has published clear statements about the purpose of each data item in the WCPT CDS, and the purpose of the data collection and collation, analysis and dissemination. The purpose of data may legitimately extend to the collection of information that, while not immediately related to the expressed purpose of the collection at a point in time, relates to the continued ability for WCPT to advocate on behalf of member organisations

Custodianship as a principle

  • Member organisations and the WCPT are the custodians of information collected from members and provider organisations, such as professional registration authorities. They do not ‘own’ data, but are responsible for the protection, storage, analysis and dissemination of the data in accord with: the purposes for which they were collected; the principles of respect and fairness outlined above; and the quality standards outlined in the following sections.

Purpose and content

WCPT Common Data Set principles

  • The data items included in a common data set should be internationally relevant and important, and able to be collected consistently and interpreted meaningfully.
  • The WCPT CDS should contribute to the goals and objectives of the WCPT and its member organisations.

Cost effectiveness

Including or changing data items imposes costs on all participants in a collection.

  • Data items should, as far as possible, be:
    • consistent with member organisation and WCPT administrative reporting procedures; and
    • able to be efficiently collected and transmitted
  • The costs of change to data items or collection methods should be weighed up against the desire for continued improvement in content.

Quality, methods and procedures

Quality of data items

Data items in the WCPT CDS should be:

  • based on international standards where appropriate
  • defined clearly, concisely and comprehensively
  • tested for meaning and feasible collection in the field; and
  • collected and maintained accurately, with opportunities for correction by the member organisation and the WCPT

Quality of data capture and collection methods

  • Member organisations should attempt to align data items on their administrative forms, such as membership and registration forms, as closely as possible with the WCPT CDS items, especially where they conform to international standard data definitions.
  • Member organisations should attempt to ensure related new developments can be mapped to the information of the WCPT CDS data items, to promote quality, consistency and continuity of international data.

Custodianship standards: security of storage and access procedures

‘Identifiable information’ is defined here to be: individual records that could be related back to an individual member organisation (or could enable the MO identity to be reasonably ascertained.)

  • Data custodians are responsible for ensuring their data holdings are protected from unauthorised access, alteration or loss.
  • Paper-based identifiable information will be kept securely locked away when not in use. The minimum requirements are that information must be accessible only to those who are authorised, and that outside normal working hours, the information must be stored in locked drawers or cabinets.
  • Particular care must be taken regarding the printout and photocopying of paper-based information. Printers, photocopiers and fax machines used to print, copy, send or receive data will not be accessible to unauthorised people.
  • Use of information technology systems to ensure the security and privacy of in-confidence information stored on computer systems including, include but are not limited to:
    • user account and password protection, use and management
    • automatic screen shutdown or automatic log-off in place on all PCs
  • Identifiable information should not be copied to or held on workstation hard disks, or copied and removed from the data holding without permission of the data custodian.
  • WCPT will take reasonable steps to destroy information if it is no longer needed for any purpose for which the information was collected. Information will be held for a maximum of 7 years.

Dissemination and use

  • Dissemination and use of the data should be in accordance with these WCPT CDS privacy and data principles relating to the purpose of the collection.
  • Data should be carefully interpreted, and any conclusions drawn based on rigorous and balanced analysis of the WCPT CDS data and other relevant information.
  • In published tables, the amount of information in small cells should be reduced to decrease the potential for member organisation identification.
  • Published data should be made available, in suitable formats to data providers.