Former American President Bill Clinton (third from right) announced a major commitment of $12 million to the Special Olympics healthy communities initiative at a meeting of the Clinton Global Initiative in September. President Clinton is pictured with four accomplished Special Olympics athletes, along with representatives from Special Olympics and donor Tom Golisano.
Former American President Bill Clinton (third from right) announced a major commitment of $12 million to the Special Olympics healthy communities initiative at a meeting of the Clinton Global Initiative in September. President Clinton is pictured with four accomplished Special Olympics athletes, along with representatives from Special Olympics and donor Tom Golisano.

WCPT network hails support for Special Olympics

WCPT’s Network for Intellectual and Developmental Disability (IDD) has welcomed a large donation to a global organisation supporting sport for people with intellectual disabilities. 

The WCPT Network for IDD is supported by the Special Olympics – the world’s largest sports organisation for people with intellectual disabilities, with nearly four million athletes in more than 170 countries. 

Special Olympics encourages those with IDD to discover their abilities and experience success. It also helps disseminate information about the WCPT IDD network to all physical therapists interested in IDD or cognitive impairments. Donna Bainbridge, Facilitator of WCPT’s Network for IDD, has welcomed news of a $12 million grant to Special Olympics from sponsors of the Clinton Global Initiative (CGI). It will mean that Special Olympics FUNfitness, the physical therapy fitness screening for members of Special Olympics will now be able to develop activities around the globe.

“This generous grant will be transformational,” said Donna Bainbridge.  “It will allow Special Olympics to engage partners and health practitioners, including physical therapists, in health care and healthy living initiatives for people with IDD worldwide in their own communities, expanding services to even more of the 200 million people with IDD around the world, many of whom remain marginalised and stigmatised in their societies.”